Best mod.... new gearbox

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Marvel

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Yeah. Use a phone or Sat nav if you require perfect speed reading.

My spare is a compromise that will ‘get me home’ it clears on the front and will cope on the back , it’s in the spirit of a space saver.

The load rating and pressure thing has been done to death. Modern low profile tyres are designed for vehicles way heavier than our buses but that do 100mph and can corner too.

I work in a risk environment. The incidence rate of reported cases of tyre failures due to being of an unoriginal size? Zero, IME. Low risk.
Totally agree about the load rating and as what @karlos said. Tyres ain’t what they used to be. My wife’s T-Roc is heavier fully laiden Vs the bus.
 

mike202

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The choice of tyre load rating can get a bit confusing. You have to look at the gross vehicle weight, which for a bus is around 2.3 tons. This is the maximum weight the vehicle can be when fully loaded. The unladen weight is the weight of the vehicle without the payload. For 'camping wagon' it's 3173lb according to my 1970 owner's manual, which is about 1442kg. So there's quite a bit of difference between the two weights.
If you take your bus camping and carry a lot of stuff then it's possible you'll come close to the gross weight. I don't really take a massive amount of gear, but sometimes may have two extra passengers (my daughters) and an awning so that would push the payload up a lot.

The VW T-Roc gross weight is 2070kgs so less than the gross weight of a bus. The tyres fitted are load rating of 92 so that's 630kg. (I googled this info)
So the gross weight of a bus is around 200kgs more. I'm not sure how that translates into load rating but obviously its more than 92.

Ultimately it's up to each owner to make their own choice as what is the best tyre for their bus. The owner's handbook recommends a tyre load capacity of 1520lbs or 690kgs, which is a load rating of 95.

I went for commercial tyres because they give more stablilty as the sidewalls are a lot stiffer than a car tyre. I also hit the kerbs a lot in car parks!

The tyres are also stockish height at 185/80. Other people may prefer lower profile tyres. The load rating is 102 or 850kg which is probably more than I'll ever need. (Hankook Vantra tyres)
By the way have you ever felt the difference in weight between a van tyre and a car tyre the same size, it's quite surprising how much heavier the van tyre is.
 

naskeet

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Is that a copy and paste job? 🤔😂

In a word, NO!

That's just me donning my official regulator's / consultant's / headmaster's hats! I am simply giving you information & advice FREE OF CHARGE, that would otherwise cost you in excess of £100 per hour.

If you're not already fully cognisant of the potential consequences of the deviations from your vehicle's factory-standard specifications, you would be wise to find out, because ignorance is not accepted as a mitigating defence in law.
 

naskeet

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The choice of tyre load rating can get a bit confusing. You have to look at the gross vehicle weight, which for a bus is around 2.3 tons. This is the maximum weight the vehicle can be when fully loaded. The unladen weight is the weight of the vehicle without the payload. For 'camping wagon' it's 3173lb according to my 1970 owner's manual, which is about 1442kg. So there's quite a bit of difference between the two weights.
If you take your bus camping and carry a lot of stuff then it's possible you'll come close to the gross weight. I don't really take a massive amount of gear, but sometimes may have two extra passengers (my daughters) and an awning so that would push the payload up a lot.

The VW T-Roc gross weight is 2070kgs so less than the gross weight of a bus. The tyres fitted are load rating of 92 so that's 630kg. (I googled this info)
So the gross weight of a bus is around 200kgs more. I'm not sure how that translates into load rating but obviously its more than 92.

Ultimately it's up to each owner to make their own choice as what is the best tyre for their bus. The owner's handbook recommends a tyre load capacity of 1520lbs or 690kgs, which is a load rating of 95.

I went for commercial tyres because they give more stablilty as the sidewalls are a lot stiffer than a car tyre. I also hit the kerbs a lot in car parks!

The tyres are also stockish height at 185/80. Other people may prefer lower profile tyres. The load rating is 102 or 850kg which is probably more than I'll ever need. (Hankook Vantra tyres)
By the way have you ever felt the difference in weight between a van tyre and a car tyre the same size, it's quite surprising how much heavier the van tyre is.

The Load Index of 102 and the corresponding "maximum" load rating of 850 kg, corresponds to a specified inflation pressure for that tyre. For example, if the specified pressure for this tyre were 60 psi and you inflated the tyre to 30 psi, as recommended for a VW Type 2's front radial-ply tyres, the resulting actual load rating would be approximately ½ x 850 kg = 425 kg [it's not an exactly linear correlation], which is well below the minimum required for the front tyres. If you're not convinced of this, I suggest you peruse the various charts at the following links:

https://tirepressure.org/tire-load-range-chart

https://tirepressure.org/general-metric-tire-load-inflation-chart

https://tirepressure.org/metric-tire-load-inflation-chart

https://tirepressure.org/p-metric-tire-load-inflation-chart

https://tirepressure.org/lt-metric-tire-load-inflation-chart

https://tirepressure.org/temporary-spare-tire-load-and-inflation-chart

Fundamentally, it is predominantly the pressurised-air which is supporting the load of the vehicle (at least 90% of it!), so the tyre's primary function is to contain the air without bursting or excessively distorting and provide a tread for traction and cornering.
 
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[email protected]

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In a word, NO!

That's just me donning my official regulator's / consultant's / headmaster's hats! I am simply giving you information & advice FREE OF CHARGE, that would otherwise cost you in excess of £100 per hour.

If you're not already fully cognisant of the potential consequences of the deviations from your vehicle's factory-standard specifications, you would be wise to find out, because ignorance is not accepted as a mitigating defence in law.
Lol, It wouldn’t cost me a penny sunshine …. I’m an HGV mechanic, engineer and seasoned heavy haulage driver, I’m most familiar with the rules and stipulations regarding axle & laden weights and maximum authorised mass etc as well as the regulations of modifying vehicles.

My bus is MOT’d, none of this mot exempt shit. All the modifications on my bus are declared on the insurance (who required an engineers report to be carried out) and are done to an extremely high standard plus the tyres are suitable for the application 😉

If you ever manage to pull yourself away from the keyboard, get to a show and see my bus there please feel free to try and find fault with it 👍🏻
 

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