Pop top lining

Help Support Early Bay Forum:

mike202

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2011
Messages
2,134
Reaction score
105
Location
Northumberland
Does anyone line their plastic pop top with anything?
I have a Westy pop top which has always just been white plastic un-lined on the inside. Most of the time it’s fine, but occasionally on colder morning there is condensation on the poptop roof inside.
I’m not even sure if that’s how they came from the factory or not.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
 

Bluesnailman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 29, 2012
Messages
785
Reaction score
1
Hi Mike. Same issue here. No evidence of anything stuck to roof before. I started with some closed cell foam and was going to cover with some roof lining material, but didn't follow through. I think it would have been a long, time consuming and possibly imperfect looking job. The plan was to make those cold and windy 'lid down' evenings a bit warmer.....

Sent from my moto g(7) plus using Tapatalk

 

davidoft

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
598
Reaction score
7
Location
hayling
Year of Van
Bay-less
Van Type
van
the later roofs and the t25 ones are flocked, you can buy a diy kit, doesnt look to tricky
 

purpledog07

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 20, 2015
Messages
133
Reaction score
13
Location
Brixham, Devon
I ask as i really need to get mine finished so just looking at what others have done.
Mine is a '72 danbury, straight up lift.
A few years ago I made a new canvas with vent and windows using acrylic canvas. It's waterproof and looks great. Some friends who do magic with stainless steel are attempting to make new telescopic struts to replace the rusty old ones and i've polished up the alloy brackets.
The only real issue is the inside is flocking.
It's 50 years old and anytime it is touched it snows fine bits/dust everywhere.
I'm not confident that DIY flocking is going to turn out uniform over such a large area and it would be really obvious if it went wrong.
I doubt a fabric material would stay stuck on over time, most glues soften with hot summer sun.
I had two options:
Find somewhere that does flocking on a large scale and pay through the nose + have to transport an old GRP roof back and forth. This is not really viable.
Or, remove the roof, sand off the flocking, glass fibre wood battens going across the roof, (flat across the middle then angled/sloping either side as the roof curves), make three long fabric headliners from 6mm ply to fix to the battens to cover everything within the canvas.
This will leave a small void above which can be lagged with 3m space blanket and allows the liners to have lighting fitted in them.
As the canvas doesn't come anywhere near the roof edges I was just going to gelcoat the overhang to pretty it up.
This option looks good as it's all stuff I have done for my work at times, so not really a challenge and all the materials are good quality and mates rates or free.
What do you guys think?
Anyone done this before?
 

Ben72Bay

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 5, 2021
Messages
185
Reaction score
65
I ask as i really need to get mine finished so just looking at what others have done.
Mine is a '72 danbury, straight up lift.
A few years ago I made a new canvas with vent and windows using acrylic canvas. It's waterproof and looks great. Some friends who do magic with stainless steel are attempting to make new telescopic struts to replace the rusty old ones and i've polished up the alloy brackets.
The only real issue is the inside is flocking.
It's 50 years old and anytime it is touched it snows fine bits/dust everywhere.
I'm not confident that DIY flocking is going to turn out uniform over such a large area and it would be really obvious if it went wrong.
I doubt a fabric material would stay stuck on over time, most glues soften with hot summer sun.
I had two options:
Find somewhere that does flocking on a large scale and pay through the nose + have to transport an old GRP roof back and forth. This is not really viable.
Or, remove the roof, sand off the flocking, glass fibre wood battens going across the roof, (flat across the middle then angled/sloping either side as the roof curves), make three long fabric headliners from 6mm ply to fix to the battens to cover everything within the canvas.
This will leave a small void above which can be lagged with 3m space blanket and allows the liners to have lighting fitted in them.
As the canvas doesn't come anywhere near the roof edges I was just going to gelcoat the overhang to pretty it up.
This option looks good as it's all stuff I have done for my work at times, so not really a challenge and all the materials are good quality and mates rates or free.
What do you guys think?
Anyone done this before?
These guys are the best flocking company in the UK:

Perhaps they could help?
 

Latest posts

Top